July 6, 2017


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Like you, we get most of our fashion inspo from Instagram and models and models on Instagram. But what if we looked to art to help us get dressed everyday? After all, it is always nice to blend in with your surroundings. In this new series, we’ll show you how to dress like some of the most iconic (mostly fictional) women of the art world. Born in Colombia in 1932, Fernando Botero is such an influential painter that a term was even coined for his unique, exaggerated style – and it’s called, duh,“Boterism.” Botero’s figures are real – and not just because of their pleasingly rotund shapes, but because of the intimate, everyday activities he shows them to be engaged in. And who better to take style cues from than women who are living their lives to the fullest?

The First Lady, 1989 ; Dress by Herve Leger By Max Azria

The First Lady, 1989 ; Dress by Herve Leger By Max Azria

Embrace those curves
Botero’s women are notoriously full-figured, and rarely shy about showing off their figures in curve-skimming dresses. Perhaps, Botero was truly the unsung great-grandfather of the body positivity movement, or maybe he was just a dude with a healthy appreciation for womanly curves. Even as the fashion industry has slowly begun to embrace women who don’t fit the typical runway model mold, artists like Botero prove that art is often the best place to look for a truly diverse representation of bodies.

Happy Birthday, 1971; Candle by Fornasetti; Glasses by Pols Potten

Happy Birthday, 1971; Candle by Fornasetti; Glasses by Pols Potten


Eat your fruits and stay hydrated

How do Botero’s women get their healthy, radiant glows? Lots of fruits, juice, and the occasional icing-covered indulgence, if the artist’s many still lifes are to be believed. When he’s not painting people, Botero renders tables filled to the brim with treats both healthy and otherwise, plus glass water bottles, jugs of wine, and large cups filled with fruit juice. Heed his suggestions and always have a beverage (preferably wine) in hand when at a party.

Woman Seated with Cat, 1994; Underwear by For Love & Lemons

Woman Seated with Cat, 1994; Underwear by For Love & Lemons

Invest in some fly lingerie
If you’re still rocking those same tattered Victoria’s Secret thongs and stretched out bras you had in college, guess what? It’s time for a serious upgrade. And why not go all out with vintage stockings, garter belts, and a lacy chemise, or matching (!) bra and underwear set. Oh, and it doesn’t matter if you don’t have a significant other: just think about how much more fun your getting ready process will be if you have something hot to wear while you do it.

The Sisters, 1969; Collar by Roberto Cavalli; Tea cup by Fornasetti

The Sisters, 1969; Collar by Roberto Cavalli; Tea cup by Fornasetti

Consider adopting a cat
I’d never advocate adopting a pet purely for fashion’s sake, but damn, does Botero make having a little kitty on your lap look impossibly cute. Think about it: a pet not only gives you something to do with your hands while posing for selfies (or, back in his days, painted portraits), but, it can also come in handy for shielding your lady bits should you want to do a more risqué shoot (you know, if that’s what you’re into). Who knew being a cat lady could be so cool and sexy?

Girl with a Hoop, 1983; Dress by Lanvin; Pumps by Dolce& Gabbana

Girl with a Hoop, 1983; Dress by Lanvin; Pumps by Dolce& Gabbana

Get in on the low, stacked heel trend
Stilettos, as classic and beautiful as they are, aren’t exactly practical. And that’s why the trend of stacked kitten heels is worth embracing, à la Botero’s comfort-conscious women. Botero often depicts his girls engaging in everyday activities like dancing, picnicking, and walking in the park. But, even when they’re posing in the boudoir, they’re rarely rocking a shoe with a heel that goes above a couple of inches. It’s also worth noting that many of them were onto the mule trend about seven decades early.

Woman Eating a Banana, 1982; Dress by Alexander McQueen; Hair accessory by Red Valentino

Woman Eating a Banana, 1982; Dress by Alexander McQueen; Hair accessory by Red Valentino

Go girly, but make it look grunge
When they’re not rocking skimpy slip dresses or elaborate lingerie, many of Botero’s women opt for a girlish way of dressing that’s not far off from a ‘90s Courtney Love, minus the torn tights and the sex appeal. It comes as no surprise that grunge king Marc Jacobs sent several similar outfits down the runway this year, and even tapped Love’s daughter, Frances Bean Cobain, to model them in his campaign. The vibe is based on Peter Pan collars, lacy details, and A-line silhouettes – and since we’re in 2017, and not 1957, do as the Cobain family does and make it edgy, not stodgy.

Writer CAIT MUNRO
Photo via: Wikiart, Pinterest
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